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The role of FANCM gene in inherited breast cancer

The role of FANCM gene in inherited breast cancer

PhD project

One in 10 breast cancers are due to inheritance of a predisposing gene. In half of these cases, the inherited gene mutation is in the well characterised BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The normal function of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is in DNA repair, to suppress cancer by removing the damage to DNA that is caused by carcinogens. Over the last few years, many other DNA repair genes have been linked with familial breast cancer, including the FANCM gene.

Our lab studies the mechanism of DNA repair by the FANCM protein using cell-based and protein chemistry-based approaches.  This project will investigate the mechanism of DNA repair by the FANCM protein using cell-based and protein chemistry-based approaches. This will involve testing the breast-cancer associated FANCM mutations in a set of assays so that we may determine why they predispose to breast cancer. A combination of approaches will be used such as studies on chemotherapy toxicity, analysis of the FANCM knockout mouse, and purification of recombinant human FANCM using state-of-the-art protein expression systems. This project will be part of a larger NHMRC-funded study into the role of DNA repair in cancer initiation and chemotherapy.

Supervised by:

  • Dr Andrew Deans
  • Disease Focus:

  • Cancer
  • Research Unit:

  • Genome stability